09.09.21

The Impetuous Weaver Weaves with Handspun, part 2

If you have been a spinner for any substantial length of time, no doubt you have a box (or two!) of lovely little bits of handspun. Whether from sampling a new fiber or technique, or leftover from larger projects, these wee skeins are too precious to get rid of, and too small and varied to become larger projects. May I humbly suggest tapestry weaving as a way to use all the small bits, and enjoy them thoroughly the whole time.

 

three containers of handspun yarn, sorted by color, sitting on dry grass

 

 

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09.03.21

Weaving with Handspun, part 1

Being a handspinner and a weaver seems like a perfect pairing of skills. So why am I terrified of weaving with my handspun yarns? (spoiler alert: it's the cutting)

 

I invite you to come on a journey with me.

 

two skeins of handspun yarn in shades of crimson, plum, and red-orange a drop spindle with the silk yarn collected on it, is held up against a background of grass the woven scarf in progress on a small loom, with a boat shuttle and extra bobbin resting on the warp

 

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04.05.21

The Impetuous Weaver Spins Silk Hankies

 You know that moment when a new skill you have been struggling with suddenly makes sense and becomes a whole lot more fun? I recently received a bit of advice that led to this AHA! moment for me, regarding spinning silk hankies.

 

a skein of handspun silk yarn and a wooden drop spindle lay on a silk hankie dyed in strips of purple, red, and orange, matching the yarn

 

Their name can be deceptive: silk hankies are not fabric, but rather a filmy square of stretched silk cocoon fiber. Naturally a glowing pearly white, they also take dye beautifully, and can contribute to beautiful nuno-felted pieces, or be spun into yarn.

 

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